Why Attendance Matters » Why Attendance Matters

Why Attendance Matters

EVERY DAY COUNTS



"A seventh grader is too tired to go to school because she stays up late play­ing video games. A sixth grader convinces his mom to let him skip class because of problems with a school bully. An eighth grader’s family schedules a vacation to start two days before spring break begins. Whatever the reason, chronic absenteeism puts a child’s academic performance and high school graduation at greater risk. Educators need to make it clear to students and par­ents that every school day matters.

Chronic absenteeism, defined as missing at least 10 percent of school days in a given year, or about 18 days, affects the educational outcomes of nearly 7.5 million U.S. students. Being absent for just two days every month of the school year can allow a child to fall behind, increasing the likelihood of dropping out. Students with regular attendance are more likely to read well by the critical third-grade milestone, score higher on standardized tests, gradu­ate high school, and go to college than students who are chronically absent." (Retrieved from Communicator, September 2013, Volume 37, Issue 1, Heidi Arthur)

 

 

Regular daily class attendance is essential in the educational process.  In accordance with G.S. 115C-378, every parent, guardian, or custodian in North Carolina having charge or control of a student between the ages of 7 and 16 years shall cause the student to attend school continuously for a period equal to the time which the public school to which the student is assigned is in session. Every parent, guardian, or custodian in North Carolina having charge or control of a child under age seven who is enrolled in a public school in grades Kindergarten through two shall also cause the child to attend school continuously for a period equal to the time which the public school to which the child is assigned shall be in session unless the child has withdrawn from school. No person shall encourage, entice, or counsel any child of compulsory age to be unlawfully absent from school. The parent, guardian, or custodian of a child shall notify the school of the reason for each known absence of the child, in accordance with local school board policy.  

 

If a student is going to miss school, it is the responsibility of the student’s parent, guardian or custodian to notify the school and explain the cause for the absences.  It is also the responsibility of the student to make up any missed work during the absence.

1 or 2 days a week doesn’t seem like much, but…



If you child misses...

That equals...

Which is...

And over 13 years of schooling that’s...

1 day every 2 weeks

20 days per year

4 weeks per year

Nearly 1 ½ years of school

1 day per week

40 days per year

8 weeks per year

Over 2 ½ years of school

2 days per week

80 days per year

16 weeks per year

Over 5 years of school

3 days per week

120 per year

24 weeks per year

Nearly 8 years of school



How about 10 minutes late a day? Surely that won’t affect my child?



He/she is only missing just...

That equals...

Which is...

And over 13 years of schooling that’s...

10 mins per day

50 mins per week

Nearly 1 ½ weeks per year

Nearly ½ of a year of school

20 mins per day

1 hour, 40 mins per week

Over 2 ½ weeks per year

Nearly 1 year of school

30 mins per day

Half a day per week

4 weeks per year

Nearly 1 ½ years of school

1 hour per day

1 day per week

8 weeks per year

Over 2 ½ years of school


EVERY DAY COUNTS

If you want your child to be successful at school then, YES, attendance does matter!